International Journal of Business & Law Research 3(2):33-43, April-June 2015


SEAHI PUBLICATIONS, 2015

JUDICIAL APPOINTMENTS IN NIGERIA: THE SELF INFLICTED INADEQUATE REPRESENTATION OF THE IGBOS IN FEDERAL COURTS


Angela E. OBIDIMMA, PhD1 & E.O.C. OBIDIMMA, PhD2
1Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State Nigeria
2Senior Lecturer, Commercial and Property Law, Faculty of Law, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State Nigeria

ABSTRACT

Judicial officers play such a major role in the administration of justice that people have personalised law and the legal order in judicial officers, and for a more effective justice administration system, judicial appointments in a federal state like Nigeria, needs an equitable representation of the various federating units; as long as the appointees meet the minimum requirements for the appointment. This paper discusses the need for a better representation of the Igbos of South East Nigeria in judicial appointments at the various federal courts. The paper notes that though there has been a general marginalisation of the Igbos in virtually every facet of governance in Nigeria, in the case of judicial appointments, it would seem that the general poor leadership among the Igbos is contributory to their inadequate representation. This is evident in the appointment of either incompetent or old persons as judges at the State High Court level. As most appointments at the federal courts are elevation of High Court judges from the states, most Igbo High Court judges may not be qualified be elevated to the federal courts. There is need for Igbo leaders to be focused and to take decisions that are in the best interest of the generality of the Igbos rather than do so for personal interests. Without this, our agitation for adequate representation in the country would be futile.
Keywords: Judicial appointments, Igbos, Nigeria, federal character, equitable representation