International Journal of Innovative Social Sciences & Humanities Research 3(2):8-14, April-June 2015


© SEAHI PUBLICATIONS, 2015

LIMINALITY AND REGENERATION IN MEJA MWANGI’S THE LAST PLAGUE AND JOSEPH SITUMA’S THE MYSTERIOUS KILLER



MUINDU, Japheth Peter
Department of Languages and Linguistics University of Kabianga, P.O. Box 2030, Kericho - KENYA

ABSTRACT
This paper is a critical interrogation of two Kenyan HIV/AIDS novels: Meja Mwangi’s The Last Plague, Joseph Situma’s The Mysterious Killer. It examines how the enactments of illness by the diseased characters in the two texts relate to their quest for meaning. The paper has drawn primarily on the existentialist notions advanced by Jean Paul Sartre and Albert Camus, the Foucauldian postulations on the politics of and the care of the self and de Certeau’s thoughts on liminality. These paradigms have the self as a shared feature and are useful in focusing the analysis to the individuality of the diseased subjects and their relationship with themselves and the complex social world around them. The paper emanates from the need to foster understanding of the ontological issues surrounding AIDS experience.
Keywords: liminality, HIV/AIDS, existential meaning, literature of disease